Category Archives: Pagan Parenting

Parenting the Very Young Pagan

I grew up in a very spiritual, nature positive household, and I am doing what I can to pass this along to my daughter. Here is some advice from what I learned from both parenting my child and from what my grandparents did with me.

  • Remember that fairy tales are still real to the young pagan. Try seeing things thru her eyes– you may be surprised how this deepens your own practice, as you start viewing the Goddess/s not as grand architypes of evoked energies but as imaginary friends made real.
  • Cook with your child. This will help build wonder, herb lore, mathematical skills (counting, fractions, etc), and a sense of being a part of the creative process. Buy your child an age appropriate (since my child is 4, her knife is a butter knife with a pink plastic handle) set of kitchen tools which are special to them that they clean and care for themselves.
  • Take your child on walks, hikes and camping. Buy them a notebook and an identification book for animals or plants and plan to find one new thing each walk, and write the name and draw a picture of it.
  • If your local park system has a Junior Rangers program, join it. This teaches the child wilderness safety and a general reverence for nature.
  • Allow your child her own fashion sense, even if that means wearing ruby slippers and a Halloween cat shirt every day for year. Have a ceremony for the cat shirt when she finally outgrows it and keep a piece either on her alter or in a scrapbook.
  • Involve your child in a spirtual community where she can meet others with similar or complimentary beliefs. Volunteer and be active in the community to show her your support and respect.This will help her give her tools later to fight any bullying she receives for being different and to fight the peer pressure associated with the Junior and Senior High years.
  • Understand that all children follow the beat of their own drummers, and often will not comply with instructions in group rituals. Adapt and don’t shame her for not listening to all the directions of adults (unless, of course it is a safety thing.
  • Give your child a sacred space to decorate however they want.
  • Play with your child and do arts and crafts with them. Praise her efforts and let her display some of her creations.

Daxton and Askel Review: Hoofprints in the Wildwood: A Devotional for the Horned Lord

Daxton says:

This book is put out by an independent publisher (Gullinbursti Press) and so we ordered it from LuLu. It is edited by Richard Derks and has lot of great contributors. Especially Sarah Lawless and Juniper Jeni, two of my favourite bloggers.  Askel is interested in the horned god so it made sense to get this book.

I’m not a follower of the horned god, because I’m a Viking, but I found the book pretty interesting. People seem to have very intense relationships with him. I’ll probably be more careful about encouraging my teenager to work with this guy.

The art work is pretty awesome especially the cover. I don’t know anything about poems but some of them seemed pretty good! Not too flowery. I liked the mix of personal stories with prayers and poems and rituals. Juni’s ritual looks pretty cool. I’ve tried some of her stuff before like the hedge raising and it works really good. I also liked seeing some research on the subject and the history. Nice to see some scholarship mixed in.

Askel says:

I really liked this book! It was awesome to get to read about the stuff people actually do and what happens. It’s not just a bunch of rituals and spell like formulas in a textbook. This all felt really real. I really liked all the poetry and there are even songs and that’s cool. I liked the pictures and the art but mostly I liked the stories. I wish there was more books like this. Written by a lot of different people just telling you what they do and not the usual books that are some expert telling you what to do like he’s special. I liked that the authors are also all very different people, women and men and different ages and stuff.

We give this book 4.5 stars out of 5